Suite One, 34 Main Street, (Murwillumbah St) Murwillumbah NSW

Shopping cart is empty.

Olwen Anderson's Blog

Should yoga be part of your life?

Saturday, February 25, 2017
Yoga pose by martin louis via MorgueFileYou’ve probably seen those lycra-clad people purposefully striding towards their yoga class, colourful rolled-up mat tucked under their arm. Should you be doing yoga too? After all, so many folk seem to be taking part these days, and apparently enjoying extra flexibility and strength as a result. 

But you’ve heard yoga’s a spiritual practice, requiring membership of a religious group. And don’t these yoga classes mean you’ll be contorting yourself into uncomfortable, impossible positions like wrapping your leg around your neck? 

Fear not. Yoga certainly is an ancient practice, ‘originating from a Hindu spiritual and ascetic discipline’ according to Google. So it began as a spiritual practice, certainly. But as more people around the world joined in it’s been modified into many different versions for those with specific needs and preferences. Some spiritual groups emphasise yoga, but just as many groups are focused only on the physicality of the practice.

Yoga has become popular because it helps develop your flexibility and strength. That means more ease of movement, and for older adults, less pain and inconvenience from lost mobility that threatens your ability to continue living independently. Yoga also returns you to connection with your body, often needed by those of us who work in intellectual fields. It also allows you to pause and de-stress, especially with the period of quiet meditation that concludes classes. Pretty good all round. 

Because yoga has become so popular, it has sparked the interest of scientists, reviewing how helpful yoga is or could be for supporting specific conditions like asthma, pain, mental health and high blood pressure.

There’s now specific yoga classes for seniors, for mums with bubs, pre-natal yoga, hot yoga, anti-gravity yoga, and some traditional forms too, Iyengar and Hatha. It’s pretty simple to work out if you fit into the ‘seniors’ or ‘pre-natal’ categories, but how do you choose which yoga style is right for you?

The best way to find a class and a teacher you can relate to is through trying out a few different classes and yoga styles, until you find one the best one for you. Keep in mind that yoga is called a ‘practice’ for a reason: you need to keep practising to achieve better results. Check your teacher is accredited to ensure they’re been trained professionally; that helps keep you safe. And, of course, if you have any pre-existing health conditions it’s a good idea to check with your doctor first. 

If you enjoyed this article, you might also enjoy 'Learn From Your Dog About Work Life Balance'

Image credit: Martin Louis via morgue file


Book An Appointment After something specific?

Recent Articles

Olwen Anderson @olwenanderson

Newsletter

Subscribe to my ezine and receive your FREE recipe ebook for healthy breakfasts now!