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Olwen Anderson's Blog

You can blame bacteria for your bad breath

Saturday, February 11, 2017
Bad breath is one of those embarrassing conditions that can really put a dampener on your social and romantic life. Finding the source can be challenging though, so here are some common causes and a couple of home remedies to help.


The key point to remember is that bacteria smell. The more bacteria, the more powerful the odour they create through their sulphurous off gassing. Somehow, humans are attuned to detecting the distinctive aroma of harmful bacteria. Perhaps that’s how we’ve learnt to detect ‘off’ food that could poison us and to feel repelled by the smell of contagious infection. Bad breath means bad bacteria, means instinctive revulsion.
The challenge with treating bad breath is discovering what part of your anatomy that smell originates from, and persisting long enough to evict the unwanted colony. Start at your mouth, as it’s a hive of bacterial activity. 


Bacteria are constantly being ingested through food, on air particles, and through kissing (technical term for a process of exchanging body fluids with others). To help keep you safe your immune system has established boundary patrols on all surfaces, called immunoglobulins. They identify potentially dangerous bacteria then alert immune cells to destroy them. This happens in all areas of your body where the inside meets the outside world: sinuses, nose, mouth, intestines, ear canals, vagina, urinary tract.


We also host colonies of commensal (helpful) bacteria on these surfaces. Although the good bacteria also have a distinctive smell, to us they don’t smell ‘bad’, because they’re ‘good’ bacteria.
Change the conditions on your internal mucous membranes and the bacterial balance will change, as will the smell. When you consider your mouth, tongue, tonsils and sinuses are full of moist little crypts harbouring bacteria, you can see how easily an odorous colony could set up their own safe haven.


Further down your digestive tract, reduced stomach acidity (which often happens with age) promotes bad breath; simply because the pH of food when it leaves your stomach affects the bacterial balance of your intestines; and bad bacteria love a more alkaline intestinal environment that an inadequately acidic stomach promotes. 


Some people find the addition of a little apple cider to water before a meal helps boost their stomach enough to restore bacterial harmony. Another home remedy for bad breath is chewing fresh parsley. But to wipe out bad breath completely you need to locate their safe havens and dislodge them by changing your internal environment.

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